Can Public Spaces make Healthier Communities?

I recently read an article by Alex Smith, Can restoring Parks lead to better health in Wyandotte County, it mentions Waterway Park as an example of a park making a comeback in downtown Kansas City, KS. What is not mentioned is that the revitalization of Waterway Park was made possible by nonprofit agencies, grant funding, a few thousand hours of volunteer labor and summer programming.

IMG_1996wCommunity Housing of Wyandotte County wrote grants, recruited volunteers to plant trees, add landscaping and install benches, put in a bike rack and nighttime illumination. Added wheelchair accessibility, started walking clubs, and provided weekly Art classes in the summer. They also partnered with the Latino Health for All nonprofit organization to help fund a soccer field. The parks department installed workout stations and the YMCA held soccer clinics and IMG_1997wprovided personal trainers to help residents get the most benefit from the stations. Free Wheels for Kids, another nonprofit, held clinics and helped bring bike races to the park. Today Waterway Park is a shining example of what a neighborhood park can be when the residents and community organizations are engaged in community building.

 

So the question remains, Can restoring Parks lead to better health in Wyandotte County? and the answer is yes, they might, but they will have to be designed to invite people in. There should be places to sit, shade for hot days, water for drinking and restrooms so you can take the kids. They will need things to look at, things that move and grab one’s attention. They will need activity, programming for exercise, Art, educational opportunities, events. They will need to serve as outdoor community centers for the surrounding neighborhoods.

0730_1156wRestoring our parks is a great idea and can help some residents live healthier lifestyles but what is going to lead to a healthier Wyandotte County, is healthier neighborhoods. IMG_2725awAvailability of fresh vegetables and fruits in these urban neighborhoods through urban farms, gardens, and the availability of healthy snacks at neighborhood stores. Developing progressive vacant lot policies, addressing vacant structures, dealing with unethical slumlords, and engaging new residents to get involved in the greening of their community. Getting young kids involved in gardening, beekeeping, and recycling at school and at home.

IMG_2807awRestoring the health of our neighborhoods will have the biggest effect on the health of our residents and especially our children. 0504_4049wThey deserve clean streets, safe pathways to school, fresh produce, programmed parks and more adults showing them the way.

2 thoughts on “Can Public Spaces make Healthier Communities?”

  1. Perhaps the better question is “will a healthy, thriving set of committed non-profits bring about a healthier community?” Thanks so much for lifting up the role of the “third sector” in creating positive change!

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